• Usually grown as an ornamental tree, but it also bears edible fruit.
  • Grows up to 10-15 m high, develops broad-stretching dense and ball-shaped crown.
  • Boasts brown and rough bark.
  • Develops sharply pointed oval leaves whose margins are coarsely saw-toothed and quite abundantly covered in hairs, their leaf blades are never palmate and have alternate arrangement on shoots.
  • Displays inconspicuous, dioecious flowers which grow on the same (monoecious) tree; male flowers gathered in light yellow pussies, while female ones globe-shaped and erected, with 2 pistils; boasts little ornamental value; flowers in May or June.
  • Bears edible fruit, similar to blackberries, ball-shaped or oval and black, up to 2.5 cm in length; extremely juicy, with sweet and sour flavour, used for making marmalade, syrup and alcohols; ripens in August.
  • Black mulberry is usually grown in parks and along roads as an ornamental tree; its hairy leaves are less tasty for the domestic silkworm larvae than the leaves of white mulberry.
  • More susceptible to frostbite than white mulberry, good for growing in cold hardiness zones 6-10.